AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE:

GUATEMALAN COFFEE FARMERS AND A CHANGING CLIMATE

Coffee and climate come together on the mountainous slopes of Guatemala, where fields — and the livelihoods of indigenous farmers — are threatened by changing rainfall, rising temperature, and a fungus called “coffee rust.” Read more here and check it out on National Geographic’s Short Film Showcase

GUARDABOSQUES - GUARDIANS OF THE FOREST

In Guatemala, half the population lives in impoverished rural areas. Their livelihoods depend on growing maize or potatoes, as well as cash crops like sugar, bananas, and coffee—all of which depend on rain. But climate models predict higher temperatures and decreased rainfall in Guatemala’s future, making the survival of these communities even more precarious. University of Arizona scientists are using hundreds of years of tree-ring data to empower Guatemalan farmers. Learn more here

DREAM DELIVERY SERVICE

Poet Mathias Svalina travels the country oh his bike delivering daily dreams to his subscribers. 

 

AFGHAN GIRLS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FUND (AGFAF) 

Through education AGFAF empowers young Afghan women who are committed to working for gender equality and improving life in Afghanistan. Fatima shares her poignant story about how the opportunities she has been allotted in the United States has transformed her life. 

 

 

WOMEN IN THE WILD

Hear from female instructors and participants on NW Outward Bound’s first female only mountaineering course.

 

 

WOMAN-OCHRE'S RETURN TO THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

The treasured painting, part of a series by celebrated abstract expressionist Willem de Kooning, is back home after being stolen from the UA Museum of Art over thirty years ago.

To read the story visit: https://uanews.arizona.edu/story/after-31-years-stolen-womanochre-returns

ARIZONA RANGELANDS

George Ruyle has been interested in farming and ranching since he was a young boy in Illinois. At the UA, he helps Arizona’s ranching community work with state and federal government to act as stewards of the land.

 

RADIOCARBON DATING

For decades, radiocarbon dating has been a way for scientists to get a picture of when once-living stuff lived. The method has been revolutionary and remains one of the most commonly used dating methods to study the past. However, according to UA researcher Charlotte Pearson, it’s ready for a makeover. By developing new ways to use radiocarbon in tree rings, she builds on the legacies of scientists before her.

 

WILDFIRE

As climate change continues to have an impact on the ecology of landscapes across the world, wildfires in the American southwest have become more frequent and intense over time. University of Arizona fire ecologist Don Falk considers whether our forests will recover from these high severity, increasingly common wildfires in the coming century.

 

SUPPORTING DREAMS 

Donors help senior Benjamin Gouveia's work towards his lifelong dream of becoming an astronaut. 

SAN JUAN RIVER TRIP

 

NAU environmental students take their learning out of the classroom and onto the river for an immersive field experience. 

NAU SWIM 

A 30 second social media spot on NAU's swim team. 

© 2019 by MARI CLEVEN

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